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Why God became human

Once there was a flock of ducks frantically flopping amidst a brewing storm. Apparently they were looking for some warmth and shelter. A certain farmer saw them and, moved to compassion, got out and tried to shoo the poor ducks into a warm shed, but the more he “shooed,” the more they panicked.

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“If only they realized I’m only trying to do what’s best for them,” the man thought to himself. “How can I make them understand my concern for their well-being? If only I could become one of them and communicate in their own language.”

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We can say that this, too, was the divine predicament: “If only I could become one of them and communicate my love for them.” Thus in the fullness of time God sent his Son into the world.

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“The Word became flesh” born of a woman in order to be seen, heard, touched, and felt. He became human to tell us that he loved us and cared for our well-being. “God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son” (Jn 3,16).

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But if God so loved the world, if God so redeemed us, why is there so much misery, so much violence, so much injustice and killings which include extra-judicial killings?

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On poverty, when Mary and Joseph arrived in Bethlehem they were confronted right away by the reality of poverty. They could not find a place to stay and the only place available for them was a stable cave, a lodging for animals.

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Once a religion teacher was telling her class about the birth of baby Jesus, when she came to the part about there being no room at the inn. One boy raised his hand and said, “Well, I blame Joseph? He should have made a reservation!”

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Of course, in those days there was no such thing as reservation but if you had money you could always find a place. Unfortunately, Joseph and May were not rich.

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In regard to the scourges of injustice, hatred and wars, the messianic salvation did not happen automatically. With Christ’s birth the turning point was indeed reached, the crisis over. Much remains to be done before the world – and our nation in particular – fully recovers.

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Every time we celebrate the birth of Christ, let it remind us of the birth of hope, in a strife-torn, sin-scarred world. It’s a joyful hope which tells us never to despair.

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The hope of Christmas is not something passive like merely waiting for the Lord to shower on us his graces and favours. Each of us must cooperate and work out his salvation, individually and collectively.

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PRAYER: Lord, give me the grace of HOPE – to see goodness and better times amidst the adversities and evil around me.

May I never lose hope in striving since the eternal message of Christmas is hope.

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LAFF ONE ANOTHER. If Sta. Claus were alive today, he’d think twice before scaling up into any chimney. Overweight, over forty, and carrying the load of a bulging tummy – Santa would be a candidate for heart attack.

Overweights, take note!

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Question: Why did the pants of Sta. Claus got wet on Christmas eve?

Answer: Because he was so busy distributing gifts that he “jingled” all the way and suffered from UTI.
(Fr. Bel R. San Luis, SVD)

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