Home » Opinion » This Is On Me (Page 33)

Japanese have long eaten fish as a staple of their diet. There are records of eating fish in Japan dating back to four or five thousand years ago. No surprise for an island nation like Japan with the currents carry small fish close to the coastal areas, and they attract packs of larger fish in pursuit, so there is an abundance of fishing grounds along the coasts.

Continue reading …

The English term for Hamachi is “yellowtail”, and Kanpachi is “amberjack”. But because yellowtail can also be called “Japanese amberjack”, overseas sushi diners sometimes think they’re the same fish.

Continue reading …

Quinoa was of great nutritional importance in pre-Columbian Andean civilizations, second only to the Potato, and was followed in importance by Maize. In contemporary times, this crop has become highly appreciated for its nutritional value, as its protein content is very high (12%–18%). Unlike wheat or rice (which are low in lysine), and like oats, Quinoa contains a balanced set of essential amino acids for humans, making it a complete protein source, unusual among plant foods. It is a good source of dietary fibre and phosphorus and is high in magnesium and iron. Quinoa is gluten-free and considered easy to digest.

Continue reading …

QUINOA (pronounced KEEN-wah) originated with the Incas in the Andes Mountains of Bolivia, Chile, and Peru. It has been at the forefront in these regions for 5,000 years. It was a sacred crop to the Incas who called it the mother of all grains or chisaya mama.

Continue reading …

Antibiotic resistance happens when bacteria mutate and adapt to become resistant to the antibiotics used to treat the infections they cause. Over-use and misuse of antibiotics exacerbate the development of drug resistant bacteria, often called superbugs. Superbug infections – including multi-drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis, typhoid and gonorrhoea – kill hundreds of thousands of people a year, and the trend is growing.

Continue reading …

Penicillin was discovered in 1928 by Scottish scientist Alexander Fleming. People began using it to treat infections in 1942. Penicillin antibiotics were among the first medications to be effective against many bacterial infections caused by staphylococci and streptococci. Penicillin is still widely used today, though many types of bacteria have developed resistance following extensive use.

Continue reading …