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Tokyo’s new guide to disaster survival, “Tokyo Bosai” (“Disaster Preparedness Tokyo”), was published on September 1, last year.

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On September 1, 1923, one of the world’s most destructive earthquakes, the Great Kanto earthquake with Magnitude 7.9, struck the Kanto Plain on the Japanese main island of Honshu. Its epicenter was situated in the Sagami Bay, 80 km south of Tokyo. However, it took only 44 seconds for the first shockwaves to hit Tokyo.

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Hokusai settled on landscaping painting when he was about 38 years old, apparently much inspired by engravings brought in by the Dutch. He was greatly interested in the examples of Western art that filtered into Japan through the Dutch trading establishments in Nagasaki. Hokusai had been creating prints for many decades, but his early works were largely works with people.

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Hokusai Katsushika was a painter during Edo Period (1615 -1868) in Japan and he was also best known for his woodblock prints. The Great Wave or The Great Wave off Kanagawa, Japan’s most iconic work of art in 19th century, (created as woodblock prints -25.7cm x 37.8cm), has become the most famous of his series of prints titled “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji “ and one of the best recognized works of Japanese art in the world.

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The seahorse is a small species of vertebrate that is found in the tropical shallow and temperate waters around the world. Yes, seahorses are fish. They stay around coral reefs where there is plenty of food and places for them to hide. The seahorses have no teeth and no stomach. Food passes through their digestive systems to quickly, they must eat almost constantly to stay alive.

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The California grunion found only on the Southern California coast is well-known for its unique springtime spawning behavior. Breeding takes place not in the water, but at extreme high tides on sandy beaches on nights just after the full moon and the new moon between March and August.

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