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Although the risk of skyscrapers collapsing due to such motions is deemed small, the government estimate shows that the top floors of such buildings in Japan’s three megalopolises could move 2 to 6 meters in each swing. Such motions could topple shelves and move furniture and office machines violently, and people would find it almost impossible to walk. People may be injured in falls, hit by swaying household items or trapped in elevators, while ceilings could cave in, the report said.

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The Japanese government has adopted two separate disaster plan since 2014. One addresses earthquakes of a magnitude-8 quake directly under Tokyo’s main 23 wards, and the other is originating in the Nankai Trough, which extends for hundreds of kilometers parallel with the Japanese coast. This has triggered six of at least 7.9 in magnitude since 1600.

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Tokyo’s new guide to disaster survival, “Tokyo Bosai” (“Disaster Preparedness Tokyo”), was published on September 1, last year.

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On September 1, 1923, one of the world’s most destructive earthquakes, the Great Kanto earthquake with Magnitude 7.9, struck the Kanto Plain on the Japanese main island of Honshu. Its epicenter was situated in the Sagami Bay, 80 km south of Tokyo. However, it took only 44 seconds for the first shockwaves to hit Tokyo.

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Hokusai settled on landscaping painting when he was about 38 years old, apparently much inspired by engravings brought in by the Dutch. He was greatly interested in the examples of Western art that filtered into Japan through the Dutch trading establishments in Nagasaki. Hokusai had been creating prints for many decades, but his early works were largely works with people.

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Hokusai Katsushika was a painter during Edo Period (1615 -1868) in Japan and he was also best known for his woodblock prints. The Great Wave or The Great Wave off Kanagawa, Japan’s most iconic work of art in 19th century, (created as woodblock prints -25.7cm x 37.8cm), has become the most famous of his series of prints titled “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji “ and one of the best recognized works of Japanese art in the world.

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